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Marine Debris

18,000 pieces of plastic are estimated to float in every square kilometre of ocean.

633 species worldwide including 77 Australian species are impacted by marine debris.

Over 75% of what is removed from our beaches is made of plastic.

Tangaroa Blue Foundation is an Australian-wide not-for-profit organisation dedicated to the removal and prevention of marine debris, one of the major environmental issues worldwide. But if all we do is clean-up, that is all we will ever do.

To successfully solve the problem, the Australian Marine Debris Initiative (AMDI) was created, an on-ground network of volunteers, communities and organisations that contribute data from rubbish collected during beach and river clean-up events to the AMDI Database, and then work on solutions to stop the flow of litter at the source. The AMDI helps communities look after their coastal environment by providing resources and support programs, and collaborates with industry and government to create change on a large scale.

In Maori and Polynesian mythology, Tangaroa is the god of the ocean. Tangaroa made laws to protect the ocean and its sea creatures "Tiaki mai i ahau, maku ano koe e tiaki"... If you look after me, then I will look after you..." When, after a week-long clean-up event, the whales and dolphins come close to our beach and slap their flippers, we sometimes wonder if it is Tangaroa saying "thank you".

Heidi Taylor “18 Most Influential”

201807 OGIn the latest issue of Ocean Geographic Magazine, Founder and CEO of Tangaroa Blue Foundation and AMDI, Heidi Taylor, has been chosen as one of the 18 Most Influential Women in Ocean Conservation. The candidates were nominated and selected based on their influence, their effectiveness, and their conservation spirit.

“Conservation is a labour of love; a constant, arduous battle with successes that are few and far between. It is challenging and demanding... It is thus not surprising that many of the successful and influential conservationists are women — they tend to persevere through obstinate challenges, they are persuasive and demonstrate dogmatic passion in their cause.

Through her 14-year career, Heidi’s work has helped to log over 10 million items in the Australian Marine Debris Database, create over 100 Source Reduction Plans, and provided a platform for communities, schools, industries, government agencies and individuals focused on reducing the amount of marine debris washing into our oceans.

Ocean Geographic’s editor Evonne Ong states that articles such as these are important: “For not only do they highlight women scaling new heights and transforming the world, they show future generations what is possible.” Says Taylor, “I am honoured to have been chosen, and give full respect to all those women featured in the issue, along with all those who continually fight for our oceans. It must have been difficult to select among so many amazing women around the world.”
More information on the article can be found on their website: http://www.ogsociety.org/

Café’s great idea for reducing plastic waste goes viral

Boomerang CupsEmu Point Café in Albany, Western Australia, put a great idea to reduce use of plastic-lined takeaway cups into action. Customers were invited to donate unwanted coffee mugs to the café for those who forgot their own reusable mugs. Cups could then be returned next visit.

This idea went viral when Melissa Joan Hart, star of Sabrina The Teenage Witch, shared a photo of their exchange program on Instagram.

Kate Marwick, Owner of the Emu Point Café said they implemented the program in the hope of a brighter and cleaner future. ‘We hope this simple environmental movement will be adopted all around Australia and the world,’ Ms Marwick said.

Perhaps more cafés and coffee drinkers around the country will adopt this wonderful idea in Plastic Free July. To read more check out the full article here.

Containers overboard litter NSW Central Coast

2018 shipping containerNSW's Central Coast beaches are being covered with successive waves of rubbish from a recent shipping accident. Following heavy swell and rough conditions at sea on the night of Thursday 31 May, 83 shipping containers were lost overboard from the Liberian ship YM Efficiency, which was making its way from Taiwan to Sydney. Not only do the containers pose a danger for other boats but the contents of these containers will now create a huge hazard for marine life for months, if not years to come.

Read more...

AMDI App Launch!!

appTangaroa Blue Foundation is proud to announce the launch of the Australian Marine Debris Initiative (AMDI) App to provide a platform for citizen scientists and AMDI partners to contribute data from their clean-up activities to the AMDI Database. This data enables the tracking of marine debris and litter items back to the source, so that source reduction plans can be implemented to stop the flow of rubbish into our oceans.

The app will be launched Tuesday 19 June at Black Head Surf Life Saving Club in NSW, and will be supported by three short training events for interested volunteers at Speers Point, Stockton and Forster from June 17-20. Anyone keen to register to attend the launch or one of the training sessions is invited to sign up via the Hunter Local Land Services events page: https://hunter.lls.nsw.gov.au/resource-hub/events

Read more...

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Upcoming Clean Up Events

Did you know?

Since 2004 Tangaroa Blue volunteers and partners have been hard at work cleaning our beaches!

  • Number of clean-up sites: 2 755
  • Number of volunteers: 114 229
  • Number of tonnes removed: 956 tonnes
  • Number of items removed: 11 313 015 items
  • Number of volunteer hours: 288 508 hours
  • Number of clean-ups: 12 478